Issue #4


Salomé Voegelin


Four scores to practice a political rhythm
(for one performer)


Counting
Stand in the middle of wherever you are
start to rock backwards and forwards,
once you found a comfortable rhythm start counting against it.

Breathing
Breath normally
listen to your breath in and out, in and out, in and out…
Stop breathing.

Tapping
Listen to the different rhythms around you
(a clock, the internet router, footsteps, voices).
Tune into one of them
tap along to it
then start to deviate, erasing its beat with your own.

Walking
Walk around the room in an uneven step
While singing your favourite pop song.




Three scores to approach the invisible together
(for a group)


Surface 

Gather as a group in a room.
Each person go close to a surface
(floor, walls, window, desk, cupboard,
and so on).
Press your ear against the surface for 5 minutes,
listen to its sounds.
Try to make that same sound for the next five minutes.

Back to Back
Go into pairs
stand back to back as close or far as you like.
Listen to each other for five minutes
make the sounds of the other for five minutes.

In a Circle
Come together into a circle,
in chairs or standing up.
Look at each other.
Start to imagine the inaudible sounds between you
when you hear it, make that sound.




Artist Bio
Salomé Voegelin is an artist and writer engaged in listening as a socio-political practice of sound. Her work and writing deal with sound, the world sound makes: its aesthetic, social and political realities that are hidden by the persuasiveness of a visual point of view. She is the author of ‘Listening to Noise and Silence’, 2010 and ‘Sonic Possible Worlds’, 2014, her third book ‘The Political Possibility of Sound’, will be published by Bloomsbury in 2018. Voegelin co-convenes ‘Points of Listening’, a monthly event for social listening and sound making, with Mark Peter Wright, www.pointsoflistening.wordpress.com, and uses her blog www.soundwords.tumblr.com, as a template for a participatory public listening, writing and sounding. As an artist Voegelin works collaboratively with David Mollin, in a practice that engages words, things and sound and focuses on invisible connections, transient behaviour and unseen rituals.
www.salomevoegelin.net

Mark